Follow Bethesda Children's Home
Locations
Bethesda Children's Home
15487 State Highway 86
Meadville, PA 16335
(814) 724-7510

Bethesda Leadership Center
349 West 18th Street
Erie, PA 16502
(814) 454-1285

Bethesda Trinity Center
462 West 18th Street
Erie, PA 16502
(814) 453-2468

Independent Living Program

This systematic approach provides the MRA-ILP clinical staff with guidelines to be informed by clinical judgment. The DSM-IV-TR diagnosis is only the first step in a comprehensive evaluation, used to formulate an individualized treatment plan. Criteria that may indicate a more intensive level of treatment than MRA-ILP can provide include:

  • Clinical indications for admission to inpatient level of care
  • Chemical dependency requiring medically monitored inpatient or detoxification services
  • Primary diagnosis of Mental Retardation
  • Infectious illness subjecting others to unnece

These conditions would prevent the adolescent from actively participating in the therapeutic milieu and would require a level of supervision or intervention not currently available at BCH MRA-ILP.
MRA-ILP: Youth, ages 16 to 21, who have often been in treatment facilities, group homes, foster care, or other placements and are in need of additional training and skill development in order to live independently. Frequently, ILP youth have poor social skills, few positive peer relationships, dysfunctional family connections, and low self-esteem. ILP youth require the support of a written Individual Service Plan and staff support to ensure safety, adequate living arrangements, continuation of education/vocational services, referrals to social service, skill development, employment, and health care services. These treatment needs can be met in a community setting.
The adolescent in treatment will gain the emotional, behavioral, educational/vocational, independent living and social skills needed to return to a less restrictive environment that may include living independently in the community.This systematic approach provides the MRA-ILP clinical staff with guidelines to be informed by clinical judgment. The DSM-IV-TR diagnosis is only the first step in a comprehensive evaluation, used to formulate an individualized treatment plan. Criteria that may indicate a more intensive level of treatment than MRA-ILP can provide include:

Bethesda Children’s Home Independent Living Program provides structured support with a reduction from the most intensive level of service for those individuals who have achieved a limited capacity for task and goal completion, conflict resolution, positive coping skills, anger management, problem solving, positive relationship skills, and who still require some level of supervision, support, and assistance. The Independent Living Program at Bethesda is also designed to provide support to adolescents who have attained most of the skills required for independent living and require minimal staff support.

  • The individual is without stable, safe, living accommodations and services that would help them develop the skills necessary for independence.Level system based on expectations, rewards, and accountability
  • The individual has not exhibited any symptoms that would require the continuation of the most intensive level of supports, but does require continued supervision because the individual is still developing processing/coping skills and is actively participating in therapy if applicable.
  • There is clinical evidence the individual is able to:
    • Initiate and participate in social interaction with staff supervision;
    • Performs assigned household chores with staff supervision;
    • Participates in the BCH MRA-ILP independent living curriculum;
    • Maintains personal hygiene and grooming with staff supervision or prompting
    • Demonstrate sufficient skills to function within the open community setting
    • Appropriately interacts and participates in recreational and social resources;
    • Expresses problems and concerns to appropriate persons;
    • Utilizes community transportation systems;
    • May have a job in the community and is actively saving money in a secure account.

    Comprehensive psychological and psychiatric evaluations conducted with the adolescents at BCH MRA-ILP follow the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Forth Edition, Text Revision (DSM IV TR) multi-axial system of diagnosis:

    • Axis I – Mental Disorders
    • Axis II – Personality Disorders – Cognitive Disorders / Mental Retardation
    • Axis III – General Medical Conditions
    • Axis IV – Psychosocial Stressors and Environmental Issues
    • Axis V – General Assessment of Functioning
    • Clinical indications for admission to inpatient level of care
    • Chemical dependency requiring medically monitored inpatient or detoxification services
    • Primary diagnosis of Mental Retardation
    • Infectious illness subjecting others to unnecessary risk
    • Demonstrated lethality toward self or others These conditions would prevent the adolescent from actively participating in the therapeutic milieu and would require a level of supervision or intervention not currently available at BCH MRA-ILP. MRA-ILP: Youth, ages 16 to 21, who have often been in treatment facilities, group homes, foster care, or other placements and are in need of additional training and skill development in order to live independently. Frequently, ILP youth have poor social skills, few positive peer relationships, dysfunctional family connections, and low self-esteem. ILP youth require the support of a written Individual Service Plan and staff support to ensure safety, adequate living arrangements, continuation of education/vocational services, referrals to social service, skill development, employment, and health care services. These treatment needs can be met in a community setting. The adolescent in treatment will gain the emotional, behavioral, educational/vocational, independent living and social skills needed to return to a less restrictive environment that may include living independently in the community. .
    • The adolescent will develop insight into their cognition and behavior, relative to their diagnosis.
    • The adolescent will develop and demonstrate skills to gain control over and eliminate inappropriate or offending behaviors; developing healthy mechanisms for handling anxiety, tension, frustration, and anger.
    • The adolescent will attain and maintain a level of academic performance that is commensurate with intellectual ability; being prepared to access the educational and/or vocational opportunities related to their skills, abilities, needs, and interests.
    • The adolescent will be prepared to reintegrate into their family system or community living setting; achieving a reasonable level of family connectedness whereby members support, help, and are concerned for each other, taking an active role in the family system.
    • The adolescent will be prepared to reintegrate into their community (neighborhoods, schools, organizations, and peer groups) demonstrating behaviors of a productive citizen.
    • The adolescent will become educated regarding personal physical health, physical development, and healthy life styles and choices.
    • The adolescent will become educated regarding their mental health, medications (if applicable), and the treatment support systems/methods.
    • The adolescent will identify leisure/recreation interests and develop associated skills to engage in appropriate pro-social recreational activities.
    • The adolescent will develop insight regarding the recognition and understanding of individuality of self and others, developing respect for cultural, ethnic, or belief system diversity (behaviors, ideas, attitudes, values, beliefs, customs, language, rituals, ceremonies, and practices characteristic of a particular group of people).
    • The adolescent will comply with the terms of probation and/ or the legal system, eliminating all illegal and antisocial behaviors; complying with rules and expectations in the home, school, and community on a consistent basis.
    • The adolescent will develop insight into other maladaptive areas of the adolescent’s life (i.e. substance use or abuse, sexually acting out behaviors, etc) that contribute to reduced functional capacity for the youth; developing skills and behaviors that support success.